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Native Americans experienced the highest increase of suicide deaths in the nation from 2020-2021, according to a report published last week by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

According to the new report, after a two-year decline, suicide deaths in the United States increased overall by 4.79% between 2020-2021. Between 2018 and 2021, increases in age-adjusted suicide rates were highest among Native Americans at 26 percent, followed Black Americans (19.2%) and Hispanics (6.8%). The report considered age, race and ethnicity-related trends between 2018 and 2021. 

As well, the new data shows a decline in white suicide deaths by 3.6%.

Per prior Native News Online reporting, Native Americans experience higher rates of suicide compared to all other racial and ethnic groups in the United States. Suicide is the 8th-leading cause of death for American Indians and Alaska Natives across all ages. The suicide rate for Native youth is 2.5 times higher than the overall national average, making these rates the highest across all ethnic and racial groups.

The American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP), the nation's largest suicide prevention organization, commented on the new report.

"With the data showing increases in suicide rates amongst Native American, Black, and Hispanic people, we see how structural racism and social and health inequities – among other factors – may be negatively impacting the mental health and suicide risk of historically marginalized communities," AFSP said in a statement. "With the data showing increases in suicide rates amongst Native American, Black, and Hispanic people, we see how structural racism and social and health inequities – among other factors – may be negatively impacting the mental health and suicide risk of historically marginalized communities." 

If you or someone close to you is having suicidal thoughts, dial the 988 Suicide & Crisis Lifeline, which provides 24/7, free and confidential support.

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