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Later this month, the Seeds of Native Health conference will convene in Prior Lake, Minnesota. The conference, a partnership between the University of Minnesota and the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux community, brings together traditional knowledge leaders of Indian Country with leading contemporary scholarship on Native health issues, and presents both in a way that supports and enhances Tribal health sovereignty. 

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Dementia affects millions of lives across the United States, and Natives are especially at risk for it given their social context. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, as many as 1 in 3 Native American elders will develop Alzheimer’s or some other form of dementia. Experts say there are a litany of factors that affect how and where Natives receive care for dementia, and medical professionals must be cognizant of them. 

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Chef Maria Parra Cano had just given birth to her third daughter. During a sacred time where parents connect with their newborn children, Parra Cano would be bedridden, at-risk of having a seizure, stroke, organ damage and even death. Parra Cano was diagnosed with postpartum preeclampsia, a serious disease that is related to high blood pressure. 

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A bone marrow transplant is a life-saving procedure for people with blood illnesses or cancers, but it’s harder for Alaska Native and mixed-race people to find matches because they’re underrepresented in the donor database. Advocates are hosting a drive next week to connect an Anchorage 6-year-old with a matching donor.

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Vice President Kamala Harris will deliver pre-recorded remarks at the National Indian Health Board (NIHB) Tribal Public Health Summit on Wednesday, May 11, where she will speak to the ongoing desperate outcomes of Native women and their maternal health journey and what she and Administration are doing to address it.

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In the Fargo-Moorhead metro area, a community of about 250,000 people spanning North Dakota and Minnesota, there is only one Native American mental healthcare provider. Her name is Whitney Fear. 

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Indigenous women from the Chiapas Nich Ixim Midwives Movement demanded that they be respected and allowed to practice midwifery freely, without being criminalized.

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Pro-choice advocates say overturning Roe v. Wade would place greater strain and hardship on Native American women in South Dakota, who are twice as likely as other races to be the victims of sexual assault, according to the U.S. Department of Justice.

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The Navajo Nation has officially declared the month of May as “Ńtsáhakees Silah’igii Baa ‘Áhayá – Navajo Nation Mental Health Awareness Month," in a proclamation issued Monday by Navajo Nation President Jonathan Nez and Vice President Myron Lizer.

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The U.S. Senate on Thursday unanimously approved a two-year extension of an act giving compensation to people who were exposed to radiation from atomic weapons testing and uranium mining. The Radiation Exposure Compensation Act (RECA), which is set to expire in July, provides one-time benefit payments to those who have been diagnosed with cancer or other diseases relating to radiation exposure. The extension now awaits approval by the House.