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PIERRE, S.D. — South Dakota Attorney General Jason Ravnsborg on Friday reversed his position on whether law enforcement should accept medical marijuana cards issued by the Flandreau Santee Sioux Tribe (FSST) to non-tribal members. Ravnsborg's announcement doubles down on South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem stance that state non-tribal residents cannot legally buy medical cannabis with a tribal card, even if it required a physician’s sign off.

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FLANDREAU, S.D. — The Flandreau Santee Sioux Tribe opened the first cannabis dispensary in South Dakota on July 1, 2021, the first day medical marijuana became legal in the state. South Dakota voters approved Measure 26, the Medical Marijuana Initiative, on November 3, 2020.

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An 80-acre plot of surplus federal land on the island of O’ahu will be offered to 200 to 400 Native Hawaiians at a rate of $1 per year for 99 years. They are part of a waitlist of 28,788 Native Hawaiians who await land promised to them by a 1920 law.  

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Situated between the high peaks and low valley floors of northern Nevada is Thacker Pass, an expanse of land that is bordered from the north and south by the Montana and Double H mountain ranges. The pass is in traditional Paiute and Shoshone land and holds great ecological and cultural significance, yet a new proposal to build an open-pit lithium mine threatens to disturb the area. 

Supreme Court of Canada
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OTTAWA, Canada — Ten years ago, Rick Desautel, a member of the Lakes Tribe of the Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT) in Washington state, shot an elk in a subsistence hunt on what was once his people’s traditional land—on the other side of the border in British Columbia, Canada.

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Just outside her shop in Wenatchee, Mary Big Bull-Lewis can see the Cascade foothills on the western edge of her hometown. Along the crest, only a little bigger than the size of a thumbnail from this distance, she can see Two Bears.
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The U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals on Tuesday ruled that Congress has the authority to enact the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA), while striking down a portion of the law that gives preference to Indigenous families in the adoption of Native American children. 

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A recent decision by the Cherokee Nation’s Supreme Court struck down a law that freedmen – descendants of people enslaved by Cherokees in the 18th and 19th centuries – cannot hold elective tribal office. The ruling is the latest development in a long-standing dispute about the tribal rights available to Black people once held in bondage by Native Americans.

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MADISON, Wis. (AP) — Chippewa tribal officials in Wisconsin, Minnesota and Michigan have blasted the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources for putting on what they say was a poorly planned wolf season during which state-licensed hunters blew past their quota in a matter of days.

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Mike McKenzie felt that he had to leave his home. He says he was no longer welcome in Skeetchestn, a community in central British Columbia west of Kamloops that’s one of 17 reserves in the Secwepemc Nation. Three years later, he’s still not home.