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Alaska is a unique place — record breaking temperatures below zero, summer nights where the sun doesn’t set, grizzly bears on your morning walk. With this comes unique laws and public policies. It can be confusing to keep track of the various Native organizations and layers of tribal enrollment options within Alaska, so we put together a list of definitions that explain some of the basics.

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Earlier this month, a federal committee determined that at least 5,892 human remains held in The University of Alabama’s museums collection are culturally linked to seven present day Muskogean-speaking tribes located throughout Alabama, Oklahoma, Louisiana, and Florida.

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The Squaxin Island Tribe of western Washington state, along the southernmost inlets of the Salish Sea, have received lands back from private owners, a forestry company called Port Blakely Companies.

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The Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe received on Wednesday an early Christmas gift from the U.S. Department of the Interior on Wednesday when it received notification from Assistant Secretary of the Interior – Indian Affairs Bryan Newland that the tribe’s reservation has been confirmed.

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The City and Borough of Wrangell in Southeast Alaska may soon reckon with its Indian boarding school history.

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NEW YORK — New York is among the four states that don’t protect all their dead from unintentional excavation—specifically those buried on private lands.

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This story was originally published by KNBA on December 15, 2021. Read the original story at KNBA. Republished by Native News Online with permission.

At this year’s Alaska Federation of Natives convention, sponsors of a ballot initiative took the opportunity to say their piece on why Tribal recognition in the state is long overdue.

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This story was originally published by KNBA on December 13, 2021. Read the original story at KNBA. Republished by Native News Online with permission.

Sponsors of a Tribal recognition initiative will speak Tuesday at the Alaska Federation of Natives annual convention.

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On November 30, Oklahoma Governor Kevin Stitt rejected a request by the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma to extend a hunting and fishing compact between the state and the Cherokee and Choctaw Nations that went into effect on January 1, 2017. The Governor’s rejection comes with disapproval from five tribes in Oklahoma, citing that Governor Stitt previously supported the compact. The Governor’s rejection of the compact means tribal members will need to pay the state rates for hunting and fishing licenses and tags.

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On Nov. 29, the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony (RSIC) and Northern Paiute group Atsa Koodakuh wyh Nuwu (People of Red Mountain) filed a first amended complaint against the federal Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The complaint, part of a lawsuit filed against BLM in February 2021, alleges that the bureau violated five federal laws when it issued permits to the Lithium Nevada company for a lithium mine in northern Nevada’s Thacker Pass. Lithium Nevada, part of Canada-based Lithium Americas, intends to start mining there next year.