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The Nebraska Commission on Indian Affairs and History Nebraska on Thursday released a list of known, named students who attended the Genoa Indian Industrial School, The school was  located in Genoa, Nebraska, some 100 miles from Lincoln, Nebraska.

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Native American children make up more than a third of the foster care caseload in Montana, despite representing less than 10% of the state’s child population. While there’s a broad consensus among child welfare experts that this outsized representation is a problem, there exists no collective strategy to address it.

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The two Democratic California U.S. senators–Sen. Alex Padilla and Laphonza Butler, have introduced 172 acres of land into trust for the benefit of the Jamul Indian Village. 

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The decade-long fight by the Apache Stronghold, a nonprofit organization composed of the some tribal citizens of San Carlos Tribe and other Native Americans,sustained a severe blow on Friday when the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in a close 6-5 ruled in favor of Rio and BHP for the Resolution Copper project. 

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More than 90 Native American artifacts—including pieces of pottery, tools and a flint knifepoint believed to be about 3,000 years old—have been found on property owned by Lehigh in Upper Saucon Township. The artifacts will be returned to Delaware Nation, a sovereign, federally recognized nation of Lenape people whose traditional homelands encompass the Lehigh Valley, including what is today Lehigh’s campus.

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This story was published by Grist in partnership with High Country News.

Before Jon Eagle Sr. began working for the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, he was an equine therapist for over 36 years, linking horses with and providing support to children, families, and communities both on his ranch and on the road.

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The Maine legislature is once again considering a bill that would restore the sovereignty of Maine’s Indigenous tribes.

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The Indigenous Cannabis Industry Association (ICIA) will host its second annual “Wisconsin Cannabis Industry and Policy Summit” in Baraboo, Wis., at the Ho-Chunk Casino & Hotel on Thursday, Feb. 29. Hosted with support from Ho-Chunk Nation, this Indigenous-led cannabis summit presents a timely education and advocacy opportunity for the benefit of the public of Wisconsin. 
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As the Charbonneau sisters continued to fight for the right to sue the Catholic Church in South Dakota for Indian boarding school abuses, the 9 Little Girls movement faced setbacks with the sudden passing of three sisters from COVID complications, cancer, and an aneurysm. With the six remaining sisters aging, their children and relatives hope to shoulder the fight for justice. But it’s proving difficult. Read the story.

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For more than a decade, nine sisters battled the South Dakota legislature for the right to sue the Catholic Church for sexual abuses they endured during the 1950s and '60s at an Indian boarding school the church operated. State lawmakers have denied these women and hundreds of other Native survivors of sexual abuses the right to sue, and some have died without receiving justice. Read part one of the story here