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“Engaging with the Native people has a powerful effect.”

“If you go out to Chaco Canyon, Mesa Verde or Acoma Pueblo, you come away in absolute awe of the history, the sophistication of the architecture and agricultural calendars. You develop an immediate appreciation for all of these communities."
- Richard Launder, President & CEO
Destination America 

Tour Operators are Seeking Indigenous Experiences

Richard Launder, President & CEO of Destination America is not alone in his feelings about the transformative experiences only found in Native destinations. Increasingly, major tour companies are adding Native tourism experiences. Recent headlines include:

Economic Benefits of Working with Tour Operators and Wholesalers 

Working with these tour companies can bring huge economic benefits to Native communities. They provide the opportunity for Native people to share their stories in their own voices while also bringing in revenue and creating jobs for tribal members.

Intrepid, for example, calls itself a "small" tour operator but sends more than 100,000 travelers a year on "grassroots and responsible travel tours." Similarly, G Adventures serves some 200,000 passengers a year. The Travel Corporation, the parent company of Destination America, encompasses 40 global brands, which collectively serve more than a million guests every year.

 Competition for inclusion in travel packages is incredibly fierce. Each organization's needs are unique, but they all start with needing irresistible travel packages that appeal to their guests.

AIANTA's Go International provides Native and tribal businesses with the tools they need to successfully work with the travel trade.

Expert speakers and hands-on presentations will help guide you in building your product(s) and promoting them to tour operators, wholesalers, domestic and international group travelers and travel media.

Register for Go International Now

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For the past decade-plus, we’ve covered the important Indigenous stories that are often overlooked by other media. From the protests at Standing Rock and the toppling of colonizer statues during the racial equity protests, to the ongoing epidemic of Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women (MMIW) and the past-due reckoning related to assimilation, cultural genocide and Indian Boarding Schools, we have been there to provide a Native perspective and elevate Native voices.

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