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Summer was one of my favorite times of the year as a child, not just for summer vacation from school, but for me it meant that the fair was coming to the Choctaw Reservation. Our fair, in Neshoba County, means different things to each of us, but collectively, it is a time to get together as a tribe and showcase our rich culture and openly invite the public to visit us and learn about us in our homeland that my ancestors refused to leave during the removal period of the 1820s and 1830s. 

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TAHLEQUAH, Okla. — Artwork is now being accepted for the 26th annual Cherokee Homecoming Art Show & Sale, which is being held in coordination with the 69th annual Cherokee National Holiday, scheduled for Aug. 27 – Sept. 25 at the Cherokee National Research Center. Due to continued concerns about the Covid-19 pandemic, the show is being offered both virtually and in person.

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This weekend and next week, Indian Country is hopping with shopping opportunities, community Powwows, and traveling totem poles.

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This week in Indian Country, Indigenous artists, dancers, and others are sharing their history with the public—and in some cases, confronting injustice. 

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CHICAGO — Earlier this month, Native Voices at the Autry presented its 27th Festival of New Plays and featured a new work by Dena’ina-Athabascan/Yupik playwright June Thiele (she/they). The 80-minute play “K’kali” is a magical, modern tale about a queer Indigenous artist who wrestles with culture, relationships, identity and a possible real-life monster.

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A wildly entertaining week in Indian Country is coming your way. 

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SAN RAFAEL, Calif. — The confines of the Covid-19 pandemic led to an abundance of closures and cancelations throughout the arts sector, especially in the performance, but some organizations sought to provide creative outlets for youth and professional performing artists. With social distancing restrictions being lifted across the country, theater companies are opening their doors to more hybrid programming and performances. 

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It’s a fine week for art and fashion in Indian Country, with another major Native art market making its way online, creative explorations of post-pandemic identity and Indigenous humor, an encounter with a bold Chippewa and Cree fashionista, and an authentic Woodland experience bursting with Ojibwe art and culture.

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Louise Erdrich’s (Chippewa) novel “The Night Watchman” and Natalie Diaz’s (Mojave) poem collection “Postcolonial Love Poem” won the Pulitzer Prizes for Fiction and Poetry, respectively, on Friday. Finalists for other prizes included a Native cartoonist’s work about current events; a true story about an Indigenous woman’s search for justice in Indian Country; and a book that explores the role of Native peoples in the Civil War. 

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A Lummi Nation totem pole making its way across the country, an annual bike ride retracing the Trail of Tears, and a weekend of Indigenous music and dancing: Here’s Native News Online’s guide for the latest happenings across Indian Country.