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SAN RAFAEL, Calif. — The confines of the Covid-19 pandemic led to an abundance of closures and cancelations throughout the arts sector, especially in the performance, but some organizations sought to provide creative outlets for youth and professional performing artists. With social distancing restrictions being lifted across the country, theater companies are opening their doors to more hybrid programming and performances. 

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It’s a fine week for art and fashion in Indian Country, with another major Native art market making its way online, creative explorations of post-pandemic identity and Indigenous humor, an encounter with a bold Chippewa and Cree fashionista, and an authentic Woodland experience bursting with Ojibwe art and culture.

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Louise Erdrich’s (Chippewa) novel “The Night Watchman” and Natalie Diaz’s (Mojave) poem collection “Postcolonial Love Poem” won the Pulitzer Prizes for Fiction and Poetry, respectively, on Friday. Finalists for other prizes included a Native cartoonist’s work about current events; a true story about an Indigenous woman’s search for justice in Indian Country; and a book that explores the role of Native peoples in the Civil War. 

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A Lummi Nation totem pole making its way across the country, an annual bike ride retracing the Trail of Tears, and a weekend of Indigenous music and dancing: Here’s Native News Online’s guide for the latest happenings across Indian Country.

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When Rep. Sharice Davids (D-Kansas) joined Native News Online for a video call this week from her home office in Roeland Park, Kan., she was backdropped by a bookshelf containing important memorabilia: a photograph of herself as a child in her mother’s arms; side-by-side flags for two of her alma maters, Kansas University and Haskell Indian Nations University; her law school degree certificate earned from Cornell Law School; and her first book, which was released June 1, "Sharice’s Big Voice."

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MONTREAL — When 22-year-old Shina Novalinga (Inuk) and her mother sing together, the two women face each other, clutching one another’s forearms, omitting an identical sound from deep in their throat that–when heard together—can mimic the sound of birds, the wind, the river, or even a puppy.

Will Sampson
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Memorial Day Weekend presents plenty of chances to honor and recognize ingenious and inspirational Indigenous role models, from a Muscogee movie star, to Navajo Code Talkers, to a powerful and influential Native American politician.  

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America is experiencing a reckoning as more BIPOC filmmakers, artists and writers are gaining momentum in telling their stories for themselves.

2019 Manito Ahbee Powwow
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A virtual version of Canada’s prime powwow, heart-stopping horse races, and a smokin’ hot shopping opportunity for Indigenous fashion fans are ready and set to go this weekend and next week in Indian Country.

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Many people today are reexamining what it means to show solidarity, especially within Black and Native communities. There is an underlying and overlooked shared history between the two groups that American culture needs to acknowledge and incorporate into its narrative. As with any progressive societal movement, it takes multiple voices to speak up and form alliances to make impactful change. Emerging and veteran BIPOC writers are reassessing their approaches to representing these stories on television.